Posts tagged #STEM

Council on Undergraduate Research - Goldwater Scholars Faculty Mentor Award

The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation (BGSF) Program (hereafter Goldwater Scholars (GS) Program) request nominations of an outstanding faculty mentor for the CUR-Goldwater Scholars (CUR-GS) Faculty Mentor Award. The faculty mentor must conduct her/his research in a Science, Technology, Engineering, or Mathematics (STEM) discipline (as defined by the Goldwater Scholars program), and must have mentored at least three (3) Goldwater Scholars during his/her career.

$5000 will be awarded to the recipient’s institution and dedicated to support of the faculty mentor’s research program and/or current undergraduate researchers.

More information HERE.

Posted on September 8, 2016 and filed under Fall.

The Wildlife Society Excellence in Wildlife Education Award

The Excellence in Wildlife Education Award celebrates exemplary teaching and contribute to the improvement of wildlife education by honoring individual faculty members. Eligible faculty should be actively engaged in undergraduate and/or graduate, wildlife-related education.

Criteria: Nominees will be evaluated on the basis of a dossier documenting outstanding contributions to wildlife education. The dossier should provide specific evidence of outstanding performance in one or more — not necessarily all — of the five categories listed below:

  • Teaching: Direct contact with students in courses and programs and in co-curricular activities. Teaching activities include instructing groups of students in classes, seminars, and laboratories; and supervising individual activities, such as practicums, internships, field-learning experiences, tutorials, performances, exhibitions, and independent study - including supervision of undergraduate and graduate research projects. Evidence of, at least, campus-level recognition of teaching excellence is desirable.

  • Advising: Activities that aid individual students with course and major selection, career plans, and personal development, especially in ways that go beyond formal curricular advising; and those that provide guidance to student organizations or groups. Documentation should include information about accessibility to students, which ordinarily includes but is not limited to office availability. Evidence of recognition by the individual’s institution of the nominees advising excellence is desirable.

  • Research Activities: Related to teaching and learning, such activities should be documented and discussed in terms of the relationship between these activities and the nominee's contributions to wildlife education. Peer-refereed publications related to education are desirable.

  • Academic Program Development: Such activities that contribute to the planning, design, or development of improvements in wildlife education. Contributions in this area might include new courses or a cluster of courses, and valuable programmatic innovations of any kind.

  • Educational Leadership: Extra-programmatic activities of any kind and at any level that constitute leadership and contribute substantially to wildlife education. Examples may include presenting papers, holding a position such as national or regional officer or program chair in a professional association, or being a member of a college committee which impacts the student educational experience.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 16, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society of Plant Biologists Excellence in Education Award

This award was initiated in 1988 to recognize outstanding teaching, mentoring, and/or educational outreach in plant biology. It is a monetary award to be made annually in recognition of excellence in teaching, leadership in curricular development, or authorship of effective teaching materials in the science of plant biology.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 16, 2016 and filed under Fall.

Ecological Society of America Eugene P. Odum Award

The Eugene P. Odum Award recognizes an ecologist for outstanding work in ecology education. This award was generously endowed by, and named for, the distinguished ecologist Eugene P. Odum. Through teaching, outreach, and mentoring activities, recipients of this award have demonstrated their ability to relate basic ecological principles to human affairs. Nominations recognizing achievements in education at the university, K–12, and public levels are all encouraged. Recent recipients include Charlene D’Avanzo, Martin B. Main, Manuel Molles, and Nathaniel Wheelwright.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 16, 2016 and filed under Fall.

National Association of Biology Teachers: The Ron Mardigian Biotechnology Teaching Award

The Ron Mardigian Biotechnology Teaching Award, sponsored by Bio-Rad Laboratories, recognizes a teacher who demonstrates outstanding and creative teaching of biotechnology in the classroom. The award is given to secondary school teachers in even numbered years, college/university instructors in odd numbered years. The award may be given for either a short-term series of activities or a long-term integration of biotechnology into the curriculum. The lessons must include active laboratory work and encompass major principles as well as processes of biotechnology. Criteria for selection include creativity, scientific accuracy and currency, quality of laboratory practice and safety, ease of replication, benefit to students and potential significance beyond the classroom. The award includes a recognition plaque to be presented at the NABT Professional Development Conference, one year of complimentary membership to NABT and $1500 (up to $500 toward travel to the NABT Professional Development Conference and $1000 in Bio-Rad materials).

More information HERE.

Posted on June 16, 2016 and filed under Spring.

National Association of Biology Teachers: Four-Year College & University Section Biology Teaching Award

This award, sponsored by NABT’s Four-Year College & University Section and Pearson, recognizes creativity and innovation in undergraduate biology teaching. These innovations may include, but are not limited to, curriculum design, teaching strategies, and laboratory utilization; they must have been implemented and demonstrated to be effective. Additionally, award winners will agree to present their work during the Undergraduate Faculty Professional Development Summit at the NABT Conference. The award is open to NABT members and includes a $1,000 honorarium, recognition plaque to be presented at the NABT Professional Development Conference, and one year of complimentary membership to NABT.

More information HERE.

 

Posted on June 16, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Microbiology Carski Foundation Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award

Honors an educator for outstanding teaching of microbiology to undergraduate students and for encouraging them to subsequent achievement. 


Eligibility: The nominee must be currently teaching microbiology in a recognized college or university, with a substantial portion of his or her time during the past five years devoted to teaching undergraduate students in microbiology, and a minimum of ten years total teaching experience. The nominee may have engaged in research or other concerns, provided that teaching undergraduates remained a substantial activity. International educators are also eligible.

 
Award: A cash prize of $2,500, a commemorative piece, and travel to the ASM General Meeting where the laureate will deliver the Carski Award lecture. 

More information HERE.

Posted on June 14, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Microbiology Graduate Teaching Award

Honors exemplary teaching and recognizes an individual for distinguished teaching of microbiology and mentoring of students at the graduate and postgraduate levels (e.g., graduate school, medical school, or other health professional schools) and for encouraging students to subsequent achievement. 

Eligibility: The nominee must be currently teaching microbiology in a recognized college or university, with a substantial portion of his or her time during the past five years devoted to teaching graduate students in microbiology, and a minimum of 10 years total teaching experience. The nominee may have engaged in research or other concerns, provided that teaching graduate students remained a substantial activity.
Award: A cash prize of $2,500, a commemorative piece, and travel to the ASM General Meeting. 

More information HERE.

Posted on June 14, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Mechanical Engineering Division - Ralph Coats Roe Award

Cofounder of Burns and Roe, Inc., Ralph Coats Roe was an avid investigator of better methods. He held nearly 50 patents generally relating to improvements for power plants and air conditioning. As recipient of the ASME George Westinghouse Gold Medal, Mr. Roe was cited for pioneering in the design and construction of highly efficient power plants and advanced desalting processes and for inspiring colleagues by great achievements through self education and highly sophisticated technologies

The Award: The award is sponsored by the Mechanical Engineering Division and consists of a $10,000 honorarium, a plaque and travel expense reimbursement for attendance at the ASEE Annual Conference. The award is funded by an endowment provided by Burns and Roe, Inc. in honor of Kenneth A. Roe's distinguished father.

Qualifications: The award recognizes a mechanical engineering educator who is an outstanding teacher and who has made the following notable professional contributions:

  1. The professional contribution may be in any appropriate category including excellence in classroom and laboratory teaching; developing a significant technique or method of analysis, procedure or synthesis; causing learning to take place through contact with students; involving students and colleagues with innovative aspects of design through problems that are relevant to real life situations; conceiving an idea of great importance to the advancement of the engineering profession or engineering education; teaching, directing or conducting significant research; providing outstanding administrative leadership; creating an important invention; carrying out distinguished service and leadership to the college, the community, the nation or to mankind.
  2. Only mechanical engineering educators who are known for their excellence in teaching are eligible, and those nominated should have exhibited this outstanding performance for at least a decade.
  3. Except for in an emergency, the recipient must attend the Mechanical Engineering Division award ceremony at the ASEE Annual Conference.
  4. The recipient must be a full-time member of a college faculty and actively engaged in teaching at the time that the award winner is selected.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Electrical and Computer Engineering Division - Frederick Emmons Terman Award

The Frederick Emmons Terman Award of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Division was established in 1969. Although Frederick Emmons Terman served Stanford University in many capacities, including head of the electrical engineering department, dean of the school of engineering, provost, vice president, and acting president, it was while he was an instructor and professor that he guided engineering students William Hewlett and David Packard, eventually urging them to set up their successful partnership. In 1942, as a result of directing the Harvard University Radio Research Laboratory, which was responsible for developing countermeasures against enemy radar, Dr. Terman received an honorary doctor's degree from Harvard, was decorated by the British government and was awarded the Presidential Medal for Merit, the highest award for civilians in the United States.

The Terman Award is bestowed annually upon an outstanding young electrical/computer engineering educator in recognition of the educator's contributions to the profession.

The Award: The award is sponsored by the Hewlett-Packard Company and consists of a $5,000 honorarium, a gold-plated medal, a bronze replica, a presentation scroll and reimbursement of travel expenses for the awardee to attend the ASEE Frontiers in Education Conference, where the award is presented.

Qualifications: In light of the successes of Dr. Terman and those of his students, the recipients of this award must meet the following requirements:

  1. Be a principal author of an electrical/computer engineering textbook, or other copyrighted electrical/computer engineering curriculum materials, which have been:
  2. Published/disseminated prior to June 1 in the year the author becomes 40 years of age, and recognized by peers to be outstanding for its original contribution to the field.
  3. Be additionally recognized for achievements in teaching, research, guidance of students and related activities.
  4. Be an electrical/computer engineering educator under 45 years of age on June 1 of the year in which the award selection is made.
  5. Be a full-time member of a college faculty and actively engaged in teaching in the United States or Canada at the time that the award winner is selected.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Aerospace Division - John Leland Atwood Award

The John Leland Atwood Award of the ASEE Aerospace Division and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was established in 1985. Lee Atwood entered aviation when it was little more than experimentation in a daring sport, though he believed that this new field would be the cornerstone of our security and serve as a principal medium of world commerce. As an outstanding engineer and leader of a great industrial corporation, Atwood played a major role in the development of aviation and aerospace technologies for more than 50 years.

The Atwood Award is bestowed annually upon an outstanding aerospace engineering educator in recognition of the educator's contributions to the profession.

The Award: The award is endowed by Rockwell International and consists of a $2,000 honorarium and a certificate. In addition, the AIAA presents a suitably engraved medal and certificate at the annual Aerospace Sciences Meeting.

Qualifications: This award recognizes the accomplishments of a superior aerospace engineering educator and his or her contributions to the profession and, therefore, requires demonstration of improvements of lasting influence to aerospace engineering education through:

  1. research, technical textbooks or the introduction of experimental courses or experimental instructional methods;
  2. technical articles on education or the introduction of new laboratory or teaching equipment;
  3. demonstration of success as a teacher and/or significant progress in aerospace engineering education and its administration;
  4. contributions and participation in pertinent educational and professional societies or other organizations important to aerospace engineering education.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Section Outstanding Teaching Award

This award is given by each ASEE section, with support, where possible, from local industry. The award, which focuses on outstanding classroom performance, recognizes teachers of engineering and engineering technology students and serves as an incentive to make further significant contributions to teaching.

The Award: The award consists of a certificate, prepared by ASEE National Headquarters, and an appropriate honorarium, where possible, presented by the local section. Each section shall determine its own level of the honorarium and fund the honorarium from its Banking and Accounting Services System fund. Presentations are made at the section annual meeting with notation in the ASEE Annual Awards Banquet Program.

Qualifications: Candidates may be teachers of any subject included in an ABET/CEAB accredited engineering or engineering technology curriculum. In addition to technical courses, subjects may include the humanities and social studies, mathematics and science.

The teacher, as an individual, must:

  1.  Possess and be able to communicate a broad and accurate knowledge of the subject area.
  2. Possess self-confidence, create a feeling of harmony between self and students and be able to meet difficulties with poise.
  3. Possess a sense of proportion, stressing fundamentals and disregarding trivial detail. Give assignments that challenge students, demanding thinking in the completion of assignments.
  4. Demonstrate such an intense interest and enthusiasm for the subject area and for the enhancement of learning processes that students are motivated to their fullest capacities.
  5. Be available for advising and counseling students before and after graduation.
  6. Teach a minimum of two semester or three quarter courses per calendar year.
  7. Have considerable endorsement from students, using both regular course evaluations and individual letters of recommendation as evidence.
  8. Attend the section annual meeting at which the award is presented; and make a presentation at that meeting (or the following section meeting) to share some element of his/her success as a teacher.
  9. Possess a strong record of activity in ASEE or the educational activities of another professional society.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Sharon Keillor Award for Women in Engineering Education

This award recognizes and honors outstanding women engineering educators. The award consists of an honorarium of $2,000 and an appropriately inscribed plaque which is presented annually at the ASEE Annual Conference.

Eligibility: The award is to recognize and honor a woman engineering educator who has an outstanding record in teaching engineering students, and reasonable performance histories of research and service within an engineering school. Nominees will hold an earned doctoral degree in an engineering discipline, or in an engineering related field of natural science, including mathematics, and will have at least five years of teaching experience in an engineering school.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: DuPont Minorities in Engineering Award

Established in 1979, this award is intended to recognize the importance of student diversity by ethnicity and gender in science, engineering and technology. The DuPont Minorities in Engineering Award is conferred for outstanding achievements by an engineering or engineering technology educator in increasing student diversity within engineering and engineering technology programs.

It is intended that this award be given to engineering or engineering technology educators who, as part of their educational activity, either assume or are charged with the responsibility for motivating underrepresented students to enter and continue in engineering or engineering technology curricula at the college or university level, graduate or undergraduate.

The Award: The award is endowed by DuPont and consists of a $1,500 honorarium, a certificate and a grant of $500 for travel expenses to the ASEE Annual Conference.

Qualifications: The candidate must demonstrate leadership in the conception, organization and operation of precollege and college activities designed to increase participation of underrepresented students in engineering or engineering technology. This should be evidenced by increases in enrollment and graduation rates of underrepresented students. All engineering educators on the faculties of U.S. engineering or engineering technology colleges are eligible.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Lifetime Achievement Award in Engineering Education

The ASEE Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes individuals who have retired or who are near the ends of their careers for sustained contributions to education in the fields of engineering and/or engineering technology. The contributions may be in teaching, education, research, administration or educational programs, professional service, or any combination thereof.

The award was established through the efforts of the ASEE Lifetime Achievement Award Steering Committee and funded by an endowment created for this award by the contributions of ASEE Life Members and like-minded, Not-Yet-Life Member Fellows.

The Award: The recipient will receive a $1,000 honorarium, travel assistance up to $1,000 for travel to the ASEE Annual Conference to receive the award, and a commemorative plaque.

Eligibility: Candidates shall have demonstrated sustained contributions to education in the fields of engineering and/or engineering technology throughout their careers. These contributions may be in any combination of the following:

  1. Demonstrated excellence in teaching either undergraduate or graduate courses
  2. Mentorship of students beyond the classroom
  3. Important contributions to the understanding of teaching and learning through the conduct and publication of educational research
  4. Demonstrated leadership through the administration of departments, schools or college of engineering or engineering technology
  5. Volunteer activity and leadership in education societies

The candidates will be retired or near retirement and will have devoted their careers primarily to engineering education. ASEE membership is not required.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: James H. McGraw Award

James H. McGraw was recognized as the dean of industrial publishers. He spent some 40 years in the publishing business, beginning as a teacher turned subscription salesman and going on to lay the foundation of one of the largest industrial publishing organizations in the world.

The purpose of the James H. McGraw Award is to recognize outstanding service in engineering technology education. It is presented to a faculty member, author, or administrator who is, or has been, affiliated with an institution that provides engineering technology education.

The Award: Established by the McGraw-Hill Book Company in 1950, the award is now cosponsored by McGraw-Hill Higher Education, the Engineering Technology Council, and the Engineering Technology Division of ASEE. The award consists of a $1,000 honorarium and a certificate.

Qualifications: This award recognizes contributions to engineering technology education. The following achievements are required:

  1. Clearly discernible contributions to engineering technology education.
  2. Outstanding achievement in one or more of the following activities specifically related to engineering technology education:
  3. Teaching: evidence of outstanding subject matter competence, student guidance and course development;
  4. Publications: textbooks, articles, reports, bulletins and tests;
  5. Administration: outstanding contributions to curriculum development, cooperation with industry, student selection and placement as well as buildings and facilities;
  6. Other activities: participation in engineering technology studies and surveys and leadership in local and national institute groups.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Frederick J. Berger Award

The purpose of the Frederick J. Berger Award is to recognize and encourage both programmatic and individual excellence in engineering technology education. It is presented to both the primary implementing individual and to the engineering technology school or department that have demonstrated leadership in curriculum, scholarly contributions, innovative techniques or administration in engineering technology education. The award jointly recognizes the individual and the activity, the individual and the program, the individual and the department or the individual and the school.

The Award: Established in 1990 by Dr. Frederick J. Berger, the award to the individual consists of a $500 honorarium and a bronze medallion, with representations of Professor Berger and of the Tau Alpha Pi logo inscribed. The academic department recognized receives a $500 honorarium and an inscribed plaque.

Qualifications: An individual must have made a significant impact on a qualifying engineering technology school or program by implementing one or more of the following criteria:

  1. Exemplary and discernible contributions to engineering technology education and to the advancement of the professional status of engineering technology students.
  2. Outstanding curricular development, evidence of superior subject matter competence by students, course development and updating and academic student advisement.
  3. Scholarly contributions including improvement of engineering technology education through authoring textbooks, syllabi and computer applications; active membership in professional societies and participation in professional development activities.
  4. Innovative techniques involving excellence in teaching and the ability to guide students to scholastic achievement, character growth and leadership potential. Innovative techniques involving laboratory updating, equipment acquisition and utilization, teaching models and aids as well as the integration of lab exercises with lecture presentations.
  5. Administrative support for course development; placement assistance; acquiring quality buildings and facilities; linking with industry and selecting, retaining and developing outstanding faculty.

A qualifying institution must be an ASEE technical college member, and must have at least one associate or baccalaureate level program accredited by TAC/ABET. A qualifying department must be housed within a qualifying institution. The institution must also have an active Tau Alpha Pi chapter on campus.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Fred Merryfield Design Award

Established in 1981 by CH2M Hill in memory of Fred Merryfield, this award recognizes an engineering educator for excellence in teaching of engineering design and acknowledges other significant contributions related to engineering design teaching.

The Award: The award recipient receives a $2,500 honorarium, a $500 stipend for travel to the ASEE Annual Conference and a commemorative plaque. In addition, the awardee's institutional department receives an award of $500.

Qualifications: Creativity and demonstrated excellence in the teaching of engineering design characterize the recipients of the Merryfield Award. Therefore, the award maintains the following qualifications:

  1.  Demonstrated excellence in teaching engineering design and ability to inspire students to high levels of accomplishment.
  2. ·       Improvement in the resources and methodology for teaching engineering design. Evidence of such achievement would include published articles, textbooks, courses or curricula, laboratory development, case studies and other innovations.
  3. ·       Improvement of engineering design teaching through encouragement of colleagues; cooperation with industry and appropriate emphasis on societal concerns, professionalism and ethics.
  4. ·       Participation in the work of at least one professional/technical society to improve the teaching of engineering design.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

American Society for Engineering Education: Benjamin Garver Lamme Award

The Benjamin Garver Lamme Award is bestowed upon a distinguished engineering educator for contributions to the art of teaching, contributions to research and technical literature and achievements that contribute to the advancement of the profession of engineering college administration.

The Award: The Lamme Trust Fund, established in 1928 in memory of Benjamin Garver Lamme, provides the funds for the award, which consists of a gold medal and certificate.

Qualifications: Representing the best in engineering education administration, the Benjamin Garver Lamme Award is bestowed upon a recipient who demonstrates the following qualities:

  1. Excellence in teaching and ability to inspire students to high levels of accomplishment.
  2. Improvement of engineering education through contributions of research, books or technical articles that have a lasting influence on engineering education.
  3. Administration of engineering schools that has led to definite and recognized improvements in the art of engineering education.
  4. Participation in the work of engineering and educational societies that has led to the improvement of engineering education.
  5. Achievements outside the field of teaching, such as personal professional development in industry, consulting work, inventions, government service, and so on. (Such achievements will be considered secondary in importance in selecting the recipient.)

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.

ASEE: American Society for Engineering Education: National Outstanding Teaching Medal

As an organization, ASEE is committed to the support of faculty scholarship and systems that develop pedagogical expertise. The National Outstanding Teaching Medal was established in 2003 by contributions from ASEE Sections, members, and industrial partners. The award is designed to provide national recognition to an engineering or engineering technology educator for excellence in outstanding classroom performance, contributions to the scholarship of teaching, and participation in ASEE Section meetings and local activities.

The Award: The award recipient receives an engraved commemorative medallion, certificate, and complimentary registration for the ASEE Annual Conference at which the award is presented. An honorarium will be included as a part of the award when funding of the endowment is completed. Each Section award winner will receive a certificate in recognition of his or her teaching excellence at the regional level.

Qualifications: Teachers of any subject included in an ABET accredited engineering or engineering technology curriculum, including faculty teaching parallel courses at two-year or community colleges, are eligible. Those teaching humanities and social studies, mathematics, science, applied science and computing science are also eligible.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 13, 2016 and filed under Spring.