Posts tagged #Economics

Economic History Association: Jonathan Hughes Prize for Excellence in Teaching Economic History

The annual Jonathan Hughes Prize is awarded to recognize excellence in teaching economic history. Jonathan Hughes was an outstanding scholar and a committed and influential teacher of economic history. The prize includes a $1,200 cash award. The winner is selected by the EHA Committee on Education and Teaching.

The Committee on Education of the Economic History Association invites nominations for the fourteenth annual Jonathan Hughes Prize for Excellence in Teaching Economic History. Letters of nomination should state what qualities of excellence the candidate’s teaching of economic history has embodied. The strength of the nominating letter will be the primary basis for selecting the pool of finalists for the prize. After arriving at a short list of finalists, the committee will gather further supporting information. Anyone is eligible to write a letter of nomination.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 16, 2016 and filed under Spring.

Southern Economic Association: Kenneth G. Elzinga Distinguished Teaching Awards

 The Kenneth G. Elzinga Distinguished Teaching Award from the Southern Economic Association annually honors one or more faculty members for outstanding contributions to economics education. Nominations for the 2014 awards will be solicited from economics department heads, from each institution in the southern part of the United States, in the spring of 2014. Nominees who are not selected are automatically placed in the pool of nominees for the subsequent year for a period of three years.

Ken Elzinga, Robert C. Taylor Professor of Economics at the University of Virginia,--first recipient of the Cavaliers’ Distinguished Teaching Professorship--is widely recognized as one of the most accomplished, effective, and influential educators in the economics profession during a distinguished teaching and research career at the University of Virginia, that has spanned over 35 years. Ken is creative and versatile in the classroom sharing his thoughts effectively with large groups of students studying the principles of economics, and using the Socratic Method, when working with students in a more advanced setting. He is a pioneer in the use of literature to explore economic reasoning which led to his writing murder mysteries that can be solved by careful economic analysis. Ken’s style of instruction and commitment to helping students develop an understanding of and appreciation for economic reasoning and insights serve as an inspiration for economic educators, so it is fitting for exemplary economic educators to be honored with an award in his name.

More information HERE.

Posted on June 16, 2016 .