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Fall 2019 Faculty Owl Days

Monday, September 23
Tuesday, September 24


As we strive to improve our teaching, our small campus affords us the opportunity to learn from colleagues within and without our departments.

Observing our peers, as they teach, has the capacity to both strengthen our faculty community and challenge our beliefs on how space, technology and presentation impact effective learning. 

The following faculty invite you to observe their work, in an incredibly broad array of spaces, styles and languages. No need to RSVP. 

The conversations sparked by our participation in one another's courses will be celebrated at a reception on Friday, September 27 at Valhalla. All faculty are welcome.

Lisa Balabanlilar, Chair of the CTE Faculty Fellows
Director of Undergraduate Studies and Associate Professor, Department of History


* Please open Rice's campus map to locate each building.
All building numbers are listed in brackets below.

Tuesday, September 24 Schedule

Monday, September 23 Schedule

Tuesday 8:00-9:15AM

Luis Duno-Gottberg
SPPO 330 Hispanic Writing Seminar
Rayzor Hall 302  [25]

Class size: Fewer than 20

In this writing intensive seminar, students will learn the skills to think and write critically in Spanish about literary and cultural production from the global Hispanic world.

 

Tuesday 10:50AM - 12:05PM

James Brown
ECON 200-001/002/003 Microeconomics
Sewall Hall 305  [39]

Class size: Fewer than 50

Intermediate level analysis of theories of household behavior, including demand for consumer goods, labor supply, and savings/investment decisions, and producer behavior including the supply of output and demands for labor, capital and other production inputs. Emphasizes individual and interactive decision making under resource constraints and discusses equilibria in competitive markets.

Tuesday 1:00PM - 2:15PM

James Brown
ECON 200-001/002/003 Microeconomics
Sewall Hall 301  [39]

Class size: Fewer than 20

Intermediate level analysis of theories of household behavior, including demand for consumer goods, labor supply, and savings/investment decisions, and producer behavior including the supply of output and demands for labor, capital and other production inputs. Emphasizes individual and interactive decision making under resource constraints and discusses equilibria in competitive markets.

Philip Ernst
ECON 307/STAT 310 Probability and Statistics
Duncan Hall 1064  [46]

Class size: More than 50

Probability and the central concepts and methods of statistics including probability, distributions of random variables, expectation, sampling distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing.

Tuesday 2:30PM - 3:45PM

Alex Byrd
HIST 217 History: The Workshop
Baker Hall 102  [47]

Class size: Fewer than 20

This course introduces students to the craft of history; formulating a question for inquiry, finding and analyzing primary sources, critiquing secondary source, and constructing an argument in support of a thesis.

Tuesday 4:00PM - 5:30PM

Jason Hafner
PHYS 125 General Physics I Homework Help Session
Herzstein Hall AMP  [4]

Class size: More than 50

The homework help session for General Physics I. Students get advice from the instructor on solving homework problems and also work together.

 

Tuesday 4:00PM - 6:30PM

Luis Duno-Gottberg
SPPO 422 Latin American Cinema
Rayzor Hall 304  [25]

Class size: Fewer than 20

This course explores the national cinemas of various regions of Latin America. Special attention is given to the different periods of its development, to the close relationship between political contexts and filmmaking, to the understanding of Latin American cinema from cultural studies views, and to the current shaping of Latin America in light of globalization.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday 9:00AM - 9:50AM

Esther Fernández
SPPO 380 Current Issues in Spain
Humanities Building 119  [49]

Class size: Fewer than 20

Exploration of diverse cultural aspects of today's Spain through films and newspaper articles. The topics discussed will serve as a springboard for further development of writing skills.

Michael Gustin
BIOC 201 Introductory Biology
Keck Hall 100  [8]

Class size: More than 50

Chemistry and energetics, cell physiology, cell biology, Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, developmental biology, and plant physiology.

Lesa Tran Lu
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I
Brockman Hall 101  [72]

Class size: More than 50

Introduction of chemical phenomena emphasizing problems and methods in Chemistry.

Monday 10:00AM - 10:50AM

Emily Houlik-Ritchey
ENGL 200 Gateways to Literary Study
Herring Hall 224  [41]

Class size: Fewer than 20

A course designed for and required of all prospective English majors. Emphasis is on close reading, literary interpretation, and critical writing. Attention is paid to the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction) across a range of historical periods.


Renata Ramos
BIOE Bioengineering Fundamentals
Duncan Hall 1046  [67]

Class size: Fewer than 50

Introduction to material, energy, charge, and momentum balances in biological systems. Steady state and transient conservation equations for mass, energy, charge and momentum will be derived and applied using basic mathematical principles, physical laws, stoichiometry, and thermodynamic properties. Problem based learning groups will solve open-ended problems.


John Zammito
HIST 101 Modern Europe, 1500-1789
Humanities Building 117  [49]

Class size: Fewer than 50

Course provides an introduction to European history from 1500 to the French Revolution, tracing Europe's rise to world dominance via capitalism, the nation-state, science and technology, and a secular world view. It asks how conditions in the rest of the world allowed European imperialism and colonialism to triumph.

 

Monday 11:00AM - 11:50AM

José Aranda
ENGL 371 Chicano/a Literature
Humanities Building 119  [49]

Class size: More than 20

A mixed-genre course focusing on the Chicano movement, the Chicano renaissance, and alternative literary and mythic traditions associated with them.


Carissa Zimmerman
SOSC 302 Quantitative Methods
Sewall Hall 305  [39]

Class size: Fewer than 50

Introduction to quantitative methods and analysis that emphasizes the practical use of statistics to address research questions in the social sciences. Includes univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis in correlational and experimental designs.

Monday 1:00PM - 1:50PM

Emily Houlik-Ritchey
ENGL 317 Arthurian Literature
Rayzor Hall 123  [25]

Class size: Fewer than 20

A survey of the origins and development of the Arthurian legend from the earliest chronicles in the sixth century and later medieval French, Welsh, Irish, and English Arthurian poems to modern adaptations of Arthurian material, including films.

Monday 2:00PM - 2:50PM

Carissa Zimmerman
PSYC 203 Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
Sewall Hall 309  [39]

Class size: More than 50

An introduction to topics in cognitive psychology, including perception, attention, language, memory, and decision making.

 

Monday 3:00PM - 3:50PM

Lisa Balabanlilar
HIST 219 Genghis Khan and the Empire of the Mongols
Humanities Building 328  [49]

Class size: Fewer than 50

The 13th century semi-nomadic tribes of Central Asia, led by Genghis (Chingis) Khan, created the largest contiguous land empire in World history, reaching from Korea to Hungary. This class examines the conditions of their rise and military success, the global impact of their conquests, and their political and cultural legacy.

 

Monday 4:00PM - 5:15PM

Robert Werth
SOCI 358 Crime, Punishment and Society
Rayzor Hall 119  [25]

Class size: Fewer than 50

A multi-faceted exploration of crime. We explore how crime is socially defined, perceived and portrayed. Next we analyze empirical patterns and theories of crime. Lastly, we examine societal responses, focusing on policing and punishment. Material will encompass both classical/foundational and contemporary scholarship, and a mix of empirical and theoretical work.