Course Design Fundamentals: Evidence of Learning
Jan
25
4:00 PM16:00

Course Design Fundamentals: Evidence of Learning

Over the 2017-18 academic year the CTE will offer a series of six one-hour workshops covering course design fundamentals. The series is organized to provide participants with the tools to design a new course from the ground up or redesign an existing course. Participants can choose to attend all workshops in the series or select individual workshops that best fit with their current course design goals. Workshops are open to all faculty and course instructors.

Course Design Fundamentals: Evidence of Learning

This workshop will begin with a brief look at how to assess students’ prior knowledge when they enter our courses.  We will then focus on how to measure student learning in our courses with both graded summative assessments as well as ungraded formative assessments.

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Workshop: Inquiry-Based Learning
Jan
29
12:00 PM12:00

Workshop: Inquiry-Based Learning

Inquiry-Based Learning Through Collaborative Group Work

Beth Beason-Abmayr, BioSciences

Collaborative group work can be an effective method to facilitate inquiry-based learning. By scaffolding assignments throughout the semester, students work in teams to progress from structured to open-ended and independent levels of inquiry. In this workshop you will learn about the collaborative group work incorporated into a 300-level elective course in BioSciences. Specifically, attendees will learn about two examples of team-based projects that promote inquiry-based learning and brainstorm strategies to design group projects for their own courses.

This lecture is open to all within the Rice community.

Beth Beason-Abmayr is a Professor in the Practice in BioSciences and uses collaborative groups in all of her lecture and lab courses.

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Feb
7
12:00 PM12:00

Brown Teaching Grant Workshop

The Committee on Teaching invites all Rice faculty members to submit grant proposals for projects that foster excellence in undergraduate teaching at Rice. Funds for these Brown Foundation Teaching grants can be used to support a variety of activities, including “seminars and other programs aimed to improve the quality of teaching, and . . . studies and experimental tests of new instructional methods or programs.” In previous years, awards have ranged from a few hundred dollars to $5,000.

Projects involving significant innovation and those that benefit a large number of students are strongly encouraged. In the past, awards have been made for purchase of equipment, supplies, and materials; for honoraria for outside speakers and consultants; for support of special events; for wages of individuals who assist with a project; and for reasonable costs associated with developing and teaching a new undergraduate course, except for supplements to the instructor’s salary. These grants are intended solely for the enhancement of undergraduate instruction, and not to support faculty research or graduate education. 

Proposals should be prepared and documented according to the attached guidelines. All proposals will be evaluated at the same time by members of the Committee on Teaching, and the Committee’s recommendations will be reviewed by the Provost’s office. Funded proposals may later be made available for other Rice faculty to read.

Interested faculty are invited to attend a workshop held by the Center for Teaching Excellence that will provide guidance on the content of successful Brown Teaching Grant proposals and information about selection criteria. The workshop is currently scheduled for Wednesday, February 7, 2018 from noon to 1 pm, in Herring 129. (Contact Josh Eyler at jeyler@rice.edu for details).

DEADLINE: Brown Teaching Grant proposals must be submitted in pdf format to geurts@rice.edu by the deadline of 5:00pm on Monday, March 5th, 2018. Proposals received after this will not be considered. For questions, or if receipt of your proposal has not been confirmed within 72 hours of submission, please email me at geurts@rice.edu.

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Graduate Instructor of Record Orientation
Dec
11
11:00 AM11:00

Graduate Instructor of Record Orientation

Each year, approximately 100 graduate students are given the opportunity to teach their own courses at Rice. As Instructors of record with full responsibility for the management of their course, these students can benefit from a more intensive introduction to teaching at Rice than we provide in our annual TA training. Toward that end, we host a Graduate Instructor of Record Orientation twice a year. Orientation for the Spring 2018 semester will take place on Monday, December 11th from 11:00AM-1:00PM in Herring 129.

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Workshop: Using CATME for Peer Evaluation
Nov
14
4:00 PM16:00

Workshop: Using CATME for Peer Evaluation

Getting started using CATME Peer Evaluation to improve performance in team-based projects

Matthew Wettergreen, Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen

Team-based projects can be an impactful method to provide context and relevancy for educational topics. But, success metrics for these experiences can have less to do with technical mastery and more to do with soft skills of individual team members. Running these projects can be time-consuming without knowledge of how to improve outcomes or suggested grading schemas to motivate students to improve. CATME Peer Evaluation (catme.org) is a research-backed system that provides information about individual contributions of team members and their teaming experiences. This system can be useful for student feedback, grading purposes, or to identify coaching opportunities.

In this workshop you will learn about the CATME Peer Evaluation system and how to get started using it. Specifically, attendees will learn how to set up the system for team-based projects, how to read the results, how to coach students based on responses, and finally, some suggested grading guidelines for using CATME.

This lecture is open to all within the Rice community.

Matthew Wettergreen is a Lecturer at the OEDK and uses CATME for every design based class with team projects. 

 
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Course Design Fundamentals: Learning Goals
Nov
9
4:00 PM16:00

Course Design Fundamentals: Learning Goals

Over the 2017-18 academic year the CTE will offer a series of six one-hour workshops covering course design fundamentals. The series is organized to provide participants with the tools to design a new course from the ground up or redesign an existing course. Participants can choose to attend all workshops in the series or select individual workshops that best fit with their current course design goals. Workshops are open to all faculty and course instructors.

Course Design Fundamentals: Learning Goals

At this session, participants will work to clarify and perhaps even expand the goals they have for their students in specific classes. Along the way, we will discuss the types of goals one might set, as well as strategies for turning broad goals into concrete outcomes that can be assessed in the classroom.

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What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Motivation and Learning in the Context of Grades
Oct
11
12:00 PM12:00

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Motivation and Learning in the Context of Grades

  • Center for Teaching Excellence (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Elephant in the Classroom: Motivation and Learning in the Context of Grades

Betsy Barre
Associate Director
Center for Teaching Excellence

Like their peers at other elite institutions, Rice undergraduates are under incredible pressure to earn high grades. And whether that pressure is social, familial, or self-imposed, the effects are similar and far reaching. From a faculty perspective, the most evident consequence of this pressure is that our students often respond quite negatively when they earn less-than-ideal grades. And we sometimes worry that our collective response to these reactions threatens the integrity of the traditional grading system. 

But the consequences of our students' anxiety about grades, as well as our reaction to that anxiety, extend far beyond grade inflation. They also have important implications for how our students approach our courses and, by extension, how much they are able to learn. In this talk, CTE Associate Director Betsy Barre will summarize what we know about the relationship between grade expectations, grading practices, and the motivation to learn.  She will then suggest strategies to minimize the negative consequences of our students' sensitivity to grades.

This lecture is open to all within the Rice community. Pizza will be served.

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2017 Pedagogy Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs
Oct
9
11:00 AM11:00

2017 Pedagogy Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs

Please join Rice’s Center for Teaching Excellence for our fall Pedagogy Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs on Monday, October 9th, from 11:00AM-2:00PM.
 

Every Classroom Is Different And Why This Matters For Teaching

Patricia Bilbao Ergueta, Physics & Astronomy
Thomas Clements, Biochemistry & Cell Biology
Emily Schultz, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Rebecca Smith, Computer Science

In this 3-hour workshop, facilitated by CTE Graduate Fellows, students will learn principles of effective college teaching and see a number of models that will help them think about what they and their students bring with them to the classroom. Participants will learn how to design course goals, incorporate them into a syllabus, and implement them in an engaging, inclusive class. Highly recommended for those who will be graduate instructors or plan to apply to academic positions.

Lunch will be served, and all graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are welcome.

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Course Design Fundamentals: Backward Design & Essential Questions
Sep
21
4:00 PM16:00

Course Design Fundamentals: Backward Design & Essential Questions

Over the 2017-18 academic year the CTE will offer a series of six one-hour workshops covering course design fundamentals. The series is organized to provide participants with the tools to design a new course from the ground up or redesign an existing course. Participants can choose to attend all workshops in the series or select individual workshops that best fit with their current course design goals. Workshops are open to all faculty and course instructors.

**NOTE: Because the first workshop in this series was cancelled when Rice closed during Hurricane Harvey, we will be covering the introductory material in this workshop, as well.
 

Course Design Fundamentals: Introduction to Backward Design and Essential Questions

In this workshop faculty will work to develop the essential questions at the heart of their course. These questions will provide a framework for course learning goals with a focus on developing and deepening student understanding of concepts, ideas, and processes. 

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What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: MECHE Labs @ Rice
Sep
18
12:10 PM12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: MECHE Labs @ Rice

Reflection on System Dynamics Principles Improves Student Performance in Labs with the Haptic Paddle

Craig McDonald, Mechanical Engineering
Chad Rose, Mechanical Engineering

Extensive work has been put into the development of simple, low-cost educational tools to improve learning by supplementing curricula with hands-on experiences. Several devices, broadly referred to as haptic paddles, have been developed to combine dynamics and mechatronics lab exercises which culminate in rendering haptic environments.Despite demonstrated student interest in haptic devices, and the foundational role of concrete experience in learning, experimental comparisons of learning outcomes over a broad range of devices have shown mixed results. Our hypothesis is that device design is addressing only a part of the learning cycle, and effort placed in encouraging and mediating a reflection phase will improve student performance. To test this hypothesis, we compared student performance between groups receiving the standard haptic paddle lab curriculum and a curriculum intended to facilitate reflection. The increases in lab scores across multiple student GPA quartiles suggest that even modest curriculum changes designed to encourage reflection can improve student performance.

This lecture is open to all within the Rice community. Pizza will be served.

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Teaching After Hurricane Harvey
Sep
8
11:45 AM11:45

Teaching After Hurricane Harvey

In conjunction with the resource page recently developed by both of our offices, the Center for Teaching Excellence and the Office of Student Wellbeing invite you to join us for a workshop on teaching after Hurricane Harvey. We will use this workshop as an opportunity to reflect on our experiences during our first week back, to plan for continued conversations, and to look ahead to future challenges that may arise in our classrooms in the coming months.

This event is open to all instructors of record. Pizza will be served.

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Course Design Fundamentals: Introduction to Backward Design
Aug
31
4:00 PM16:00

Course Design Fundamentals: Introduction to Backward Design

UPDATE: This event was one of many that was cancelled when Rice closed during Hurricane Harvey. Instead of rescheduling, we will cover this material during our second course design workshop, scheduled for September 21st.

Over the 2017-18 academic year the CTE will offer a series of six one-hour workshops covering course design fundamentals. The series is organized to provide participants with the tools to design a new course from the ground up or redesign an existing course. Participants can choose to attend all workshops in the series or select individual workshops that best fit with their current course design goals. Workshops are open to all faculty and course instructors.

Course Design Fundamentals: Introduction to Backward Design

The series will begin with an introduction to Backward Design principles that will provide the foundation for the rest of the workshops in the series. This workshop offers the opportunity for faculty to reflect on and discuss their teaching goals in their courses and programs.

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Workshop on Umbrella IRB for Teaching-Related Research
Aug
23
to Aug 24

Workshop on Umbrella IRB for Teaching-Related Research

We are pleased to report that Rice's IRB has recently approved an umbrella IRB for ongoing pedagogical research at Rice.  The Center for Teaching Excellence will be leading the research program, and anyone doing teaching-related research can join our protocol.

It is our hope that this will streamline the process for pedagogical research projects considerably, and we believe that this program will not only be of great benefit to our students, but it will also enhance Rice’s visibility nationally with respect to teaching and learning initiatives.  

We invite those who want to join our umbrella IRB, or simply learn more about the process, to attend one of two workshops on either August 23rd or August 24th. Both will be held in Herring 129 from 12:00-1:00PM.

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Graduate Student TA Training
Aug
21
to Aug 22

Graduate Student TA Training

At Rice University, teaching assistants (TAs) play an important role in the success of many of the university’s courses. Serving as a teaching assistant provides many benefits to the students and faculty as well as the graduate student taking on this role. Directly assisting and working with undergraduates and one’s peers brings with it many rewards in addition to many responsibilities.

Each year, the CTE hosts training sessions to provide TAs with the basic information necessary to perform their work in these roles responsibly. We spend most of the session introducing the federal regulations and institutional policies that govern this work (ADA, FERPA, Title IX, Amorous Relations, and the Honor Code), but end with some quick tips for grading and working with students in office hours.

The 2017 TA Training will take place across two repeat sessions on Monday, August 21st from 11:30-12:30 and Tuesday, August 22nd from 12:00-1:00. Slides can be accessed below.

 
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New Faculty Orientation
Aug
16
9:00 AM09:00

New Faculty Orientation

We welcome all new Rice faculty to Day 2 of New Faculty Orientation. The Center for Teaching Excellence will lead interactive discussions on teaching goals, syllabi preparation, and effective teaching strategies. Morning coffee and pastries, as well as lunch, will be served.

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Graduate Instructor of Record Orientation
Aug
14
12:00 PM12:00

Graduate Instructor of Record Orientation

Each year, approximately 100 graduate students are given the opportunity to teach their own courses at Rice. As Instructors of record with full responsibility for the management of their course, these students can benefit from a more intensive introduction to teaching at Rice than we provide in our annual TA training. Toward that end, we will be hosting our first ever Graduate Instructor of Record Orientation on Monday, August 14th from 12:00-2:00PM.

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CITI Training for Teaching-Related Research
Jul
10
to Jul 14

CITI Training for Teaching-Related Research

As required by federal regulations, any investigator conducting human subjects research must complete CITI Training, and specifically the “Social-Behavioral-Educational (SBE)” Basic Course. This includes faculty who want to complete teaching-related research under the CTE's newly established Umbrella IRB protocol.

You can register for and begin the CITI training here:  https://about.citiprogram.org/en/homepage/.

Because we realize that CITI certification takes a bit of time, we will provide lunch to those who want to come to Herring 129 to work on the training the week of July 10th. We will open up the space from 11:00am-2:00pm each day, and all you need to bring is your laptop and your appetite!

If you plan to attend at some point that week, please e-mail Josh Eyler so he can estimate how much pizza we should order each day.

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A Career at a Small College: Integrating Teaching and Research
May
4
1:00 PM13:00

A Career at a Small College: Integrating Teaching and Research

Amy Cheng Vollmer
Isaac H. Clothier Jr. Professor of Biology
Swarthmore College

Preparing for a career at a four-year college, with a focus on undergraduate students, requires you to balance teaching and research.  Come and learn about different ways to obtain teaching experience and what kinds of systems and questions lend themselves to productive research by undergraduate students.  There will also be advice about your application, letters of recommendation, mentoring, networking and resources about pedagogy – and plenty of time for Q&A.  While the presenter’s perspective is from the sciences, Dr. Amy Cheng's nearly 30-year experience at Mills and Swarthmore Colleges, interacting with colleagues in the humanities and social sciences, her remarks and advice will be pertinent to graduate students and postdocs of all disciplines.

 

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Annual Teaching Award Ceremony and Reception
Apr
25
3:00 PM15:00

Annual Teaching Award Ceremony and Reception

The entire campus community is invited to join us as we celebrate teaching at Rice and—in particular—those instructors who care very deeply about student learning. There will be a wine and appetizer reception following the ceremony. All students, faculty, alumni, and staff are encouraged to attend! No RSVP required.

Awards Presented:
George R. Brown Prize for Excellence in Teaching
George R. Brown Awards for Superior Teaching
Charles W. Duncan Achievement Award for Outstanding Faculty
Nicolas Salgo Outstanding Teaching Award
Presidential Award for Mentoring
Sarah A. Burnett Teaching Prize in the Social Sciences
(T+R)^2 Award, School of Engineering
Sophia Meyer Farb Prize for Teaching (Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award)
STC Teaching Award (for Student-Taught Courses)
NEW! Graduate Instructor of Record Award
NEW! Graduate TA Award for Course Support
NEW! Graduate TA Award for Student Support

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What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Challenging the Biased Brain: Creating Constructive Dialogue in the Classroom
Apr
18
12:10 PM12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Challenging the Biased Brain: Creating Constructive Dialogue in the Classroom

Cognitive scientists, as well as those who are focused on science communication, have been telling us for some time that you can’t change people’s minds by simply confronting them with facts. In fact, research demonstrates that underlying patterns in our thinking encourage us to deny, ignore, or refute facts that challenge our current way of understanding the world around us and make it difficult for us to be open to new ideas, beliefs, and facts. What does this mean for students in our classroom and how can we design our classes to encourage students to be open to new ideas and understandings? 

In this talk Robin Paige, Associate Director of the CTE, will begin with a look at the research on cognition, bias, and learning that explores why developing constructive and meaningful dialogue in the classroom is central to creating deeper learning, and why this type of learning can be so difficult to facilitate.  She will then focus on the evidence for the most effective teaching strategies that enable students to challenge their misconceptions in meaningful ways that open them up to new ideas, understanding, and beliefs. Strategies discussed are applicable to all disciplines, topics, and fields.

This lecture is open to all within the Rice community. Pizza will be served.

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What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: How Much Should We Assign? What the Research Can (and Can't) Tell Us
Mar
28
12:10 PM12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: How Much Should We Assign? What the Research Can (and Can't) Tell Us

Have you ever wondered how much time students spend on the work you've asked them to complete outside of class? Have you ever thought, when designing your syllabi, that you might be assigning more or less than is reasonable, given your own expectations for out of class work? If so, you are not alone. "How much work should I be assigning?" is one of the most common questions we are asked in our work with faculty and graduate students. If you're curious about what the research has to say, please join us for lunch in Herring 129 on Tuesday, March 28th.

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Rice University's Inaugural Treybig Teaching  and Innovation Lecture
Mar
6
11:00 AM11:00

Rice University's Inaugural Treybig Teaching and Innovation Lecture

Michelle K. Smith
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
C. Ann Merrifield Professorship in Life Science Education
University of Maine

"What Are My Students Thinking? Using Multiple Modes of Assessment to Identify and Improve Student Conceptual Understanding"

Instructors and the teaching practices they employ play a critical role in improving student learning in college Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses.  Consequently, there is increasing interest in assessing student content knowledge at multiple points throughout the undergraduate curriculum.  To help facilitate this process, I will present the development of a new tool: Ecology and Evolution Measuring Achievement and Progression in Science (EcoEvo-MAPS), which is a comprehensive content assessment taken by first-year and graduating undergraduate students.  I will also discuss how student data collected from this tool has inspired groups of faculty from multiple institutions to share de-identified student learning data with one another, collaboratively develop in-class active-learning instructional units, and create additional formative assessment opportunities to understand more about student thinking.

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Don’t Bring a Test Tube to a Bunsen Burner Fight:  Connecting Activist STEM Education with Policy
Feb
28
1:00 PM13:00

Don’t Bring a Test Tube to a Bunsen Burner Fight: Connecting Activist STEM Education with Policy

Michael Barnett
Professor, Science Education and Technology
Lynch School of Education
Boston College

"Science and engineering have been responsible for over half of the growth of the U.S. economy since the second world war. In doing so, scientists and science educators have gained the respect of the public through their competence, but have we gained their trust? In general scientists, as a group, are not seen as warm or approachable, but perceived as argumentative with little interest in understanding the nuance or context. This trustworthiness gap is magnified, when politicians develop a similar attitude toward science and scientists. These attitudes, in turn, impact large scale and important decisions about science and basic research and can directly affect the public well-being, from the growth of our economy, to public health, to the education of our young people.  

In this talk, we will explore where STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education is today, the future of STEM education, and how we can engage both the general public and policy makers in rational dialogue around the role and importance of STEM education. Examples of empowering citizens and, most importantly, youth in engaging the public in scientific dialogue will be discussed.”

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What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Teaching Undergraduate Students Through Research Experiences
Feb
21
12:10 PM12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Teaching Undergraduate Students Through Research Experiences

Often, students participating in research experiences see the learning focused on technical skills, while faculty see research as an application-based extension of the theory learned in class teaching higher-order thinking and professional "soft" skills. What skills are most important to teach in the research environment? How do I focus on teaching undergraduate students while still attaining my research goals? This talk, presented by CHBE Postdoctoral Scholar Dan Marincel, aims to answer these questions by discussing the literature on undergraduate research experiences.

Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students. 

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Graduate Institute: Preparing for the Academic Job Market
Feb
10
9:00 AM09:00

Graduate Institute: Preparing for the Academic Job Market

Are you a graduate student or postdoctoral scholar preparing to go on the job market? If so, please join Rice’s Center for Teaching Excellence for our spring Graduate Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs on Friday, February 10th, from 9AM-11AM in Herring 129. In this 2-hour hands-on and interactive workshop, we will discuss how to find and interpret job advertisements, how to create materials that best convey your research and teaching abilities and interests, how best to anticipate and respond to questions in the interview process, and how to demonstrate one’s teaching abilities in an on-campus setting.  

Coffee and pastries will be served, and all graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are welcome.

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Course Design Workshop
Feb
9
9:00 AM09:00

Course Design Workshop

Are you preparing to teach a new course, looking to redesign assignments or assessments, thinking about integrating active learning in your course, or considering revising your course learning goals? If so, we invite you to join us in a hands-on course design workshop on Thursday, February 9th from 9-11am in Herring 129.

Over two hours faculty will apply research-based teaching and learning principles to designing a new course or elements of their existing courses. Topics covered include: conceptualizing a course meta-question, drafting/revising learning goals, designing assignments, activites, and assessments.

Coffee and pastries will be served. This workshop is open to all instructors at Rice University.

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Spring Reading Group: Mindset
Feb
7
12:10 PM12:10

Spring Reading Group: Mindset

The Center for Teaching Excellence invites you to join us this spring as we read Carol Dweck's Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

Discussions will take place from 12:10-1:00PM in Herring 129 on three Tuesdays in February (7th, 14th, and 28th). All faculty, staff, and graduate students are welcome.

The CTE will provide copies of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success to all participants who register by January 30th.

Registration has been closed.

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Faculty Owl Days (Day 2 of 2)
Feb
1
8:00 AM08:00

Faculty Owl Days (Day 2 of 2)

As we strive to improve our teaching, our small campus affords us the opportunity to learn from colleagues within and without our departments. Observing our peers, as they teach, has the capacity to both strengthen our faculty community and challenge our beliefs on how space, technology and presentation impact effective learning. Faculty invite you to observe their work, in an incredibly broad array of spaces, styles and languages. No need to RSVP. 

*Click here to download a PDF of the courses arranged by day/time. PDF updated 1/26/17

Michael Gustin,  Chair of the CTE Faculty Fellows
Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

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Faculty Owl Days (Day 1 of 2)
Jan
31
8:00 AM08:00

Faculty Owl Days (Day 1 of 2)

As we strive to improve our teaching, our small campus affords us the opportunity to learn from colleagues within and without our departments. Observing our peers, as they teach, has the capacity to both strengthen our faculty community and challenge our beliefs on how space, technology and presentation impact effective learning. Faculty invite you to observe their work, in an incredibly broad array of spaces, styles and languages. No need to RSVP. 

*Click here to download a PDF of the courses arranged by day/time. PDF updated 1/26/17

Michael Gustin,  Chair of the CTE Faculty Fellows
Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

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Brown Teaching Grant Workshop
Jan
26
12:10 PM12:10

Brown Teaching Grant Workshop

The University's Committee on Teaching administers a grant from the Brown Foundation for the purpose of fostering excellence in undergraduate teaching at Rice.  The Committee is charged with supporting any appropriate means to this end, including “seminars and other programs aimed to improve the quality of teaching, and . . . studies and experimental tests of new instructional methods or programs.”  The Committee invites faculty members to submit proposals for projects to be funded by this grant. Funding for grants in previous years has ranged from a few hundred dollars to awards of $5,000. In the past, grants have been given for purchase of equipment and materials, for honoraria for outside speakers and consultants, for necessary expenses such as purchases of computer time, for wages of individuals who assist in the projects, and for any reasonable cost associated with developing and teaching an undergraduate course except one involving supplement to the instructor’s salary. These grants are intended for the enhancement of undergraduate instruction, rather than for faculty research or graduate instruction. Projects involving significant innovation and those that benefit a large number of students are strongly encouraged.

The Committee on Teaching and the Center for Teaching Excellence will be facilitating an information session on the application process on Thursday, January 26th, from 12:10-12:50 in Herring 129.

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What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Getting Started with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Jan
24
12:10 PM12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Getting Started with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Interested in conducting research on teaching effectiveness and student learning in your classes? Join us for a discussion of how to get started in the scholarship on teaching and learning. We will begin the hour with a brief overview of project design and setup as well as the Rice IRB approval process. A panel of experienced Rice scholars will then discuss their experiences conducting, analyzing, and publishing research on teaching and learning. The panel will be composed of:

  • Margaret Beier, Psychology
  • John Hutchinson, Dean of Undergraduates & Chemistry
  • Stephen Wang, Mathematics

Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students.

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What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Why Collaborative Learning Works and How to Make it Happen
Nov
16
12:00 PM12:00

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Why Collaborative Learning Works and How to Make it Happen

Robin Paige, Assistant Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence

Is group work an effective means to teach students disciplinary content and skills or does it simply teach social skills such as cooperation and teamwork? While faculty are often uncertain whether disciplinary learning takes place in groups, the research shows that carefully planned and facilitated student interaction promotes learning. In this talk, I will present research on how and why carefully organized student interaction through cooperative and collaborative learning techniques enable students to engage in knowledge production, develop complex and critical thinking, and build fluency with the course material. In addition, because the effectiveness of these learning strategies largely depends on the quality of student interaction, I will discuss strategies for planning, managing, and assessing collaborative learning in all fields and disciplines.

About the "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" Series:
Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students.

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