What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: How Much Should We Assign? What the Research Can (and Can't) Tell Us
Mar
28
12:10 pm12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: How Much Should We Assign? What the Research Can (and Can't) Tell Us

  • Herring 129

Have you ever wondered how much time students spend on the work you've asked them to complete outside of class? Have you ever thought, when designing your syllabi, that you might be assigning more or less than is reasonable, given your own expectations for out of class work? If so, you are not alone. "How much work should I be assigning?" is one of the most common questions we are asked in our work with faculty and graduate students. If you're curious about what the research has to say, please join us for lunch in Herring 129 on Tuesday, March 28th.

Annual Teaching Award Ceremony and Reception
Apr
25
3:00 pm15:00

Annual Teaching Award Ceremony and Reception

The entire campus community is invited to join us as we celebrate teaching at Rice and—in particular—those instructors who care very deeply about student learning. There will be a wine and appetizer reception following the ceremony. All students, faculty, alumni, and staff are encouraged to attend! No RSVP required.

Awards Presented:
George R. Brown Prize for Excellence in Teaching
George R. Brown Awards for Superior Teaching
Charles W. Duncan Achievement Award for Outstanding Faculty
Nicolas Salgo Outstanding Teaching Award
Presidential Award for Mentoring
Sarah A. Burnett Teaching Prize in the Social Sciences
(T+R)^2 Award, School of Engineering
Sophia Meyer Farb Prize for Teaching (Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award)
STC Teaching Award (for Student-Taught Courses)
NEW! Graduate Instructor of Record Award
NEW! Graduate TA Award for Course Support
NEW! Graduate TA Award for Student Support


Rice University's Inaugural Treybig Teaching  and Innovation Lecture
Mar
6
11:00 am11:00

Rice University's Inaugural Treybig Teaching and Innovation Lecture

  • Herring 129

Michelle K. Smith
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
C. Ann Merrifield Professorship in Life Science Education
University of Maine

"What Are My Students Thinking? Using Multiple Modes of Assessment to Identify and Improve Student Conceptual Understanding"

Instructors and the teaching practices they employ play a critical role in improving student learning in college Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses.  Consequently, there is increasing interest in assessing student content knowledge at multiple points throughout the undergraduate curriculum.  To help facilitate this process, I will present the development of a new tool: Ecology and Evolution Measuring Achievement and Progression in Science (EcoEvo-MAPS), which is a comprehensive content assessment taken by first-year and graduating undergraduate students.  I will also discuss how student data collected from this tool has inspired groups of faculty from multiple institutions to share de-identified student learning data with one another, collaboratively develop in-class active-learning instructional units, and create additional formative assessment opportunities to understand more about student thinking.

Don’t Bring a Test Tube to a Bunsen Burner Fight:  Connecting Activist STEM Education with Policy
Feb
28
1:00 pm13:00

Don’t Bring a Test Tube to a Bunsen Burner Fight: Connecting Activist STEM Education with Policy

  • Kyle Morrow Room

Michael Barnett
Professor, Science Education and Technology
Lynch School of Education
Boston College

"Science and engineering have been responsible for over half of the growth of the U.S. economy since the second world war. In doing so, scientists and science educators have gained the respect of the public through their competence, but have we gained their trust? In general scientists, as a group, are not seen as warm or approachable, but perceived as argumentative with little interest in understanding the nuance or context. This trustworthiness gap is magnified, when politicians develop a similar attitude toward science and scientists. These attitudes, in turn, impact large scale and important decisions about science and basic research and can directly affect the public well-being, from the growth of our economy, to public health, to the education of our young people.  

In this talk, we will explore where STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education is today, the future of STEM education, and how we can engage both the general public and policy makers in rational dialogue around the role and importance of STEM education. Examples of empowering citizens and, most importantly, youth in engaging the public in scientific dialogue will be discussed.”

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Teaching Undergraduate Students Through Research Experiences
Feb
21
12:10 pm12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Teaching Undergraduate Students Through Research Experiences

Often, students participating in research experiences see the learning focused on technical skills, while faculty see research as an application-based extension of the theory learned in class teaching higher-order thinking and professional "soft" skills. What skills are most important to teach in the research environment? How do I focus on teaching undergraduate students while still attaining my research goals? This talk, presented by CHBE Postdoctoral Scholar Dan Marincel, aims to answer these questions by discussing the literature on undergraduate research experiences.

Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students. 

Graduate Institute: Preparing for the Academic Job Market
Feb
10
9:00 am09:00

Graduate Institute: Preparing for the Academic Job Market

  • Herring 129

Are you a graduate student or postdoctoral scholar preparing to go on the job market? If so, please join Rice’s Center for Teaching Excellence for our spring Graduate Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs on Friday, February 10th, from 9AM-11AM in Herring 129. In this 2-hour hands-on and interactive workshop, we will discuss how to find and interpret job advertisements, how to create materials that best convey your research and teaching abilities and interests, how best to anticipate and respond to questions in the interview process, and how to demonstrate one’s teaching abilities in an on-campus setting.  

Coffee and pastries will be served, and all graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are welcome.

Course Design Workshop
Feb
9
9:00 am09:00

Course Design Workshop

  • Herring 129

Are you preparing to teach a new course, looking to redesign assignments or assessments, thinking about integrating active learning in your course, or considering revising your course learning goals? If so, we invite you to join us in a hands-on course design workshop on Thursday, February 9th from 9-11am in Herring 129.

Over two hours faculty will apply research-based teaching and learning principles to designing a new course or elements of their existing courses. Topics covered include: conceptualizing a course meta-question, drafting/revising learning goals, designing assignments, activites, and assessments.

Coffee and pastries will be served. This workshop is open to all instructors at Rice University.

Spring Reading Group: Mindset
Feb
7
12:10 pm12:10

Spring Reading Group: Mindset

  • Herring 129

The Center for Teaching Excellence invites you to join us this spring as we read Carol Dweck's Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

Discussions will take place from 12:10-1:00PM in Herring 129 on three Tuesdays in February (7th, 14th, and 28th). All faculty, staff, and graduate students are welcome.

The CTE will provide copies of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success to all participants who register by January 30th.

Registration has been closed.

Faculty Owl Days (Day 2 of 2)
Feb
1
8:00 am08:00

Faculty Owl Days (Day 2 of 2)

As we strive to improve our teaching, our small campus affords us the opportunity to learn from colleagues within and without our departments. Observing our peers, as they teach, has the capacity to both strengthen our faculty community and challenge our beliefs on how space, technology and presentation impact effective learning. Faculty invite you to observe their work, in an incredibly broad array of spaces, styles and languages. No need to RSVP. 

*Click here to download a PDF of the courses arranged by day/time. PDF updated 1/26/17

Michael Gustin,  Chair of the CTE Faculty Fellows
Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Faculty Owl Days (Day 1 of 2)
Jan
31
8:00 am08:00

Faculty Owl Days (Day 1 of 2)

As we strive to improve our teaching, our small campus affords us the opportunity to learn from colleagues within and without our departments. Observing our peers, as they teach, has the capacity to both strengthen our faculty community and challenge our beliefs on how space, technology and presentation impact effective learning. Faculty invite you to observe their work, in an incredibly broad array of spaces, styles and languages. No need to RSVP. 

*Click here to download a PDF of the courses arranged by day/time. PDF updated 1/26/17

Michael Gustin,  Chair of the CTE Faculty Fellows
Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Brown Teaching Grant Workshop
Jan
26
12:10 pm12:10

Brown Teaching Grant Workshop

  • Herring 129

The University's Committee on Teaching administers a grant from the Brown Foundation for the purpose of fostering excellence in undergraduate teaching at Rice.  The Committee is charged with supporting any appropriate means to this end, including “seminars and other programs aimed to improve the quality of teaching, and . . . studies and experimental tests of new instructional methods or programs.”  The Committee invites faculty members to submit proposals for projects to be funded by this grant. Funding for grants in previous years has ranged from a few hundred dollars to awards of $5,000. In the past, grants have been given for purchase of equipment and materials, for honoraria for outside speakers and consultants, for necessary expenses such as purchases of computer time, for wages of individuals who assist in the projects, and for any reasonable cost associated with developing and teaching an undergraduate course except one involving supplement to the instructor’s salary. These grants are intended for the enhancement of undergraduate instruction, rather than for faculty research or graduate instruction. Projects involving significant innovation and those that benefit a large number of students are strongly encouraged.

The Committee on Teaching and the Center for Teaching Excellence will be facilitating an information session on the application process on Thursday, January 26th, from 12:10-12:50 in Herring 129.

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Getting Started with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Jan
24
12:10 pm12:10

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Getting Started with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

  • Herring 129

Interested in conducting research on teaching effectiveness and student learning in your classes? Join us for a discussion of how to get started in the scholarship on teaching and learning. We will begin the hour with a brief overview of project design and setup as well as the Rice IRB approval process. A panel of experienced Rice scholars will then discuss their experiences conducting, analyzing, and publishing research on teaching and learning. The panel will be composed of:

  • Margaret Beier, Psychology
  • John Hutchinson, Dean of Undergraduates & Chemistry
  • Stephen Wang, Mathematics

Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students.

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Why Collaborative Learning Works and How to Make it Happen
Nov
16
12:00 pm12:00

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Why Collaborative Learning Works and How to Make it Happen

Robin Paige, Assistant Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence

Is group work an effective means to teach students disciplinary content and skills or does it simply teach social skills such as cooperation and teamwork? While faculty are often uncertain whether disciplinary learning takes place in groups, the research shows that carefully planned and facilitated student interaction promotes learning. In this talk, I will present research on how and why carefully organized student interaction through cooperative and collaborative learning techniques enable students to engage in knowledge production, develop complex and critical thinking, and build fluency with the course material. In addition, because the effectiveness of these learning strategies largely depends on the quality of student interaction, I will discuss strategies for planning, managing, and assessing collaborative learning in all fields and disciplines.

About the "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" Series:
Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students.

Pedagogy Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs
Oct
17
11:00 am11:00

Pedagogy Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs

WHAT DO YOU BRING TO THE CLASSROOM?

Patricia Bilbao Ergueta, Physics & Astronomy
Anthony Bosman, Mathematics
Thomas Clements, Biochemistry & Cell Biology
Carissa Phillips-Garrett, Philosophy

Please join Rice’s Center for Teaching Excellence for our fall Pedagogy Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs on Monday, October 17th, from 11:00AM-2:00PM. In this 3-hour workshop, facilitated by CTE Graduate Fellows, students will learn principles of effective college teaching and see a number of models that will help them think about what they and their students bring with them to the classroom. Participants will learn how to design course goals, incorporate them into a syllabus, and implement them in an engaging, inclusive class. Highly recommended for those who will be graduate instructors or plan to apply to academic positions.

Lunch will be served, and all graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are welcome.

Please RSVP no later than October 13th here.

Checking-in: Collecting, Interpreting, and Utilizing Feedback from Students
Oct
11
9:00 am09:00

Checking-in: Collecting, Interpreting, and Utilizing Feedback from Students

In a famous synthesis of hundreds of meta-analyses on student learning, the education researcher John Hattie concluded that “far and away the most effective teaching intervention … [is] raising the quality of the feedback teachers receive about their impact.” And this seems to hold for both the direct feedback teachers receive (via student performance on assessments) as well as the indirect feedback they receive when asking students to reflect on their learning. In this workshop we will introduce faculty to both the scholarship on feedback and various strategies they might adopt to collect, interpret, and utilize that feedback in their classrooms.

If you are interested in participating please RSVP here.

Coffee and pastries will be served. This workshop is open to all instructors at Rice University.

Faculty Owl Days (Day 2 of 2)
Sep
21
8:00 am08:00

Faculty Owl Days (Day 2 of 2)

As we strive to improve our teaching, our small campus affords us the opportunity to learn from colleagues within and without our departments. Observing our peers, as they teach, has the capacity to both strengthen our faculty community and challenge our beliefs on how space, technology and presentation impact effective learning. The following 50 faculty invite you to observe their work, in an incredibly broad array of spaces, styles and languages. No need to RSVP. 

Faculty Owl Days Listing

The conversations sparked by our participation in one another's courses will be celebrated at a reception in Rice’s newest teaching space and home of our Center for Teaching Excellence, Herring 129, Friday, September 18 from 4-6 pm. All faculty are welcome.

Michael Gustin,  Chair of the CTE Faculty Fellows
Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

 

Faculty Owl Days (Day 1 of 2)
Sep
20
8:00 am08:00

Faculty Owl Days (Day 1 of 2)

  • Across Campus

As we strive to improve our teaching, our small campus affords us the opportunity to learn from colleagues within and without our departments. Observing our peers, as they teach, has the capacity to both strengthen our faculty community and challenge our beliefs on how space, technology and presentation impact effective learning. The following 50 faculty invite you to observe their work, in an incredibly broad array of spaces, styles and languages. No need to RSVP. 

Faculty Owl Days Listing

The conversations sparked by our participation in one another's courses will be celebrated at a reception in Rice’s newest teaching space and home of our Center for Teaching Excellence, Herring 129, Friday, September 18 from 4-6 pm. All faculty are welcome.

Michael Gustin,  Chair of the CTE Faculty Fellows
Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Why Failure is Essential for Student Learning
Sep
14
12:00 pm12:00

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Why Failure is Essential for Student Learning

Josh Eyler, Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence

September 14th from noon-1pm in Herring 129

About the Presentation: Everybody knows that scientists walk into their labs and immediately make world-changing discoveries, right?  And isn’t it true that writers, too, create their magnum opus on the first attempt?  Of course not.  As academics, we long ago realized that research, discovery, and learning are lengthy processes marked by stops, starts, and a fair degree of failure before we come close to success, however that might be defined by our respective fields and universities.  Higher education, on the other hand, does not often allow for this process of learning to play out. Students are frequently asked to achieve, on their first attempts, stellar results on high-stakes, high-pressure assessments.  New research on the science of learning is beginning to show us that this strategy does not work well, because it is not how human beings naturally learn.  We need to make mistakes before we can get the right answers.  In this talk, I’ll be reviewing some of the most important findings in this new area of inquiry and suggesting ways that we can generate “opportunities for failure” in our courses so that our students may learn more effectively. 

 

About the "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" Series:
Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students.

 

 

 

 

Graduate Student TA Training
Aug
22
11:00 am11:00

Graduate Student TA Training

At Rice University, teaching assistants (TAs) play an important role in the success of many of the university’s courses. Serving as a teaching assistant provides many benefits to the students and faculty as well as the graduate student taking on this role. Directly assisting and working with undergraduates and one’s peers brings with it many rewards in addition to many responsibilities.

Each year, the CTE hosts training sessions to provide TAs with the basic information necessary to perform their work in these roles responsibly. We spend most of the session introducing the federal regulations and institutional policies that govern this work (ADA, FERPA, Title IX, Amorous Relations, and the Honor Code), but end with some quick tips for grading and working with students in office hours.

The 2016 TA Training will take place across two repeat sessions on Monday, August 22nd in Herring 129. 

New Faculty Orientation
Aug
17
9:00 am09:00

New Faculty Orientation

  • Herring 129

We welcome all new Rice faculty to Day 2 of New Faculty Orientation. The Center for Teaching Excellence will lead interactive discussions on teaching goals, syllabi preparation, and effective teaching strategies. Morning coffee and pastries, as well as lunch, will be served.

Annual Teaching Award Ceremony & Reception
Apr
26
3:00 pm15:00

Annual Teaching Award Ceremony & Reception

  • Herring Hall 100

The entire campus community is invited to join us as we celebrate teaching at Rice and—in particular—those instructors who care very deeply about student learning. There will be a wine and appetizer reception in Herring Hall 129 following the ceremony. All students, faculty, alumni, and staff are encouraged to attend! No RSVP required.

2016 Brown Lecture on Teaching Excellence:
Presented by Yousif Shamoo
2015 Recipient, George R. Brown Prize for Excellence in Teaching
Vice Provost for Research
Professor of Biosciences
Wiess Career Development Chair
Director, Institute of Biosciences & Bioengineering

Awards Presented:
George R. Brown Prize for Excellence in Teaching
George R. Brown Awards for Superior Teaching
Charles W. Duncan Achievement Award for Outstanding Faculty
Nicolas Salgo Outstanding Teaching Award
Presidential Award for Mentoring
Sarah A. Burnett Teaching Prize in the Social Sciences
Sophia Meyer Farb Prize for Teaching (Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award)
NEW! STC Teaching Award (for Student-Taught Courses)
(T+R)^2 Award, School of Engineering

A special presentation of the George R. Brown Certificate of Highest Merit will be made to Michael C. Gustin, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology. The Certificate bestows the status of honorary lifetime recipient, and its winners are retired from the Brown competition.

Stereotype Threat: What It Is and How It Affects Our Teaching
Apr
6
12:00 pm12:00

Stereotype Threat: What It Is and How It Affects Our Teaching

  • Herring 129

Negative stereotypes impose an intellectual burden on many minorities as well as those who believe that others perceive their performance or abilities in negative ways.  The threat of possibly satisfying or confirming a stereotype - often referred to as stereotype threat in the literature - can interfere with a student’s performance on a variety of tasks. Stereotype threat is one of several factors that contribute to academic inequality, yet the research shows that it is also one of the factors that can be easily addressed. In this talk I will discuss what the current research on stereotype threat tells us about how stereotypes affect individuals, why it happens, and how we can address it our classrooms.

About the "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" Series:
Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students.

Please RSVP here.

Graduate Student Institute: Preparing for the Academic Job Market
Apr
1
9:00 am09:00

Graduate Student Institute: Preparing for the Academic Job Market

  • Herring Hall 129

Are you a graduate student or postdoctoral scholar preparing to go on the job market? If so, please join Rice’s Center for Teaching Excellence for our spring Graduate Student Institute for Graduate Students and Postdocs on Friday, April 1st, from 9AM-12PM in Herring 129. In this 3-hour hands-on and interactive workshop, we will discuss how to find and interpret job advertisements, how to create materials that best convey your research and teaching abilities and interests, how best to anticipate and respond to questions in the interview process, and how to demonstrate one’s teaching abilities in an on-campus setting.  

Coffee and pastries will be served, and all graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are welcome.

Please RSVP here. The Institute will be limited to the first 60 registrants.

Course Design Workshop
Mar
31
9:00 am09:00

Course Design Workshop

  • Herring Hall 129

Are you preparing to teach a new course, looking to redesign assignments or assessments, thinking about integrating active learning in your course, or considering revising your course learning goals? If so, we invite you to join us in a hands-on course design workshop on Thursday March 31st from 9-11am in Herring 129.  

Over two hours faculty will apply research-based teaching and learning principles to designing a new course or elements of their existing courses. We will begin by exploring learner-centered design principles in a large group setting after which participants will break off into smaller working groups organized around specific course design goals. Participants will be able to chose from among the following breakout sessions:

  • Refining learning goals
  • Assignment (re)design
  • Collaborative and cooperative learning activities

If you are interested in participating please RSVP here.

Coffee and pastries will be served. This workshop is open to all instructors at Rice University.

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Curiosity and the College Classroom
Mar
16
12:00 pm12:00

What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning: Curiosity and the College Classroom

  • Herring Hall 129

Josh Eyler
Director, Rice CTE

About the Presentation:
Curiosity is an essential part of the way human beings learn, and it always has been. In order to learn something, we must first wonder about it. This was true of our distant ancestors, and it is true of all of us. Researchers have shown, though, that somewhere between the time when children are very young and when they find their way to our college classrooms, the lion’s share of this curiosity is lost. I'll suggest some ways that we might try to find it again and why the search matters so much for higher education.

About the "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" Series:
Each semester, the CTE hosts at least one formal research presentation on a specific question addressed within the scholarship of teaching and learning. The "What's New in Research on Teaching and Learning" talks take place over lunch (provided by the CTE) and are open to all faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students.

Please RSVP here.

Spring Reading Group: Excellent Sheep
Feb
16
12:05 pm12:05

Spring Reading Group: Excellent Sheep

  • 129 Herring Hall

Following the success of last year's Reading Group, the Center for Teaching Excellence invites you to join us this spring as we read William Deresiewicz's provocative Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life. As one of the most controversial books on higher education of the last decade, Deresiewicz's book has already captured the attention of many faculty and students on campus. And after receiving numerous requests to make this our selection this year, we decided we would take it on in the sprit of critical inquiry that is the hallmark of the liberal tradition Deresiewicz wants us to champion.

Discussions will take place from 12:00-1:00PM in Brockman 101 on alternating Tuesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester (February 16th and 25th, as well as March 8th, 17th, 22nd, and 31st). All faculty, staff, and graduate students are welcome.

Teaching Matters: Balancing Teaching and Research
Feb
3
12:00 pm12:00

Teaching Matters: Balancing Teaching and Research

  • Herring Hall 129

Are teaching and research opposing forces? At times it may feel difficult to strike a balance between the demands of research and the demands of teaching.  However, the skills required to be excellent at both teaching and research are not mutually exclusive.

Join us on Wednesday February 3rd at noon in Herring 129 for a faculty-centered conversation on strategies for balancing teaching and research with Elaine Howard Ecklund, the Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences and Professor of Sociology.

This conversation is part of our Teaching Matters series for Rice faculty.

Please RSVP here. Lunch will be provided.

Brown Teaching Grant Application Process - Information Session
Jan
22
12:00 pm12:00

Brown Teaching Grant Application Process - Information Session

  • Herring Hall 129

Each year, the University's Committee on Teaching administers a grant from the Brown Foundation for the purpose of fostering excellence in undergraduate teaching at Rice (more information here). In this session on January 22nd, CTE staff will help applicants better understand the goals and expectations of the Brown Grants, and provide guidance about the content of successful proposals. RSVP not required.

3rd Annual Symposium on Teaching and Learning: How Do We Learn & Why Does It Matter?
Jan
15
10:00 am10:00

3rd Annual Symposium on Teaching and Learning: How Do We Learn & Why Does It Matter?

  • McMurtry Auditorium

10:00 AM

"Inside the Undergraduate Classroom: Instructor Practices and Barriers to Implementing Active Learning Strategies at Rice"

Margaret Beier
Associate Professor of Psychology
Rice University

Lunch and Roundtable Discussions

11:15 AM

12:15 PM

"Teaching for Learning: Evidence-Based Strategies Designed to Help Students Learn Difficult Material"

Todd D. Zakrajsek
Executive Director, Academy of Educators
Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine

Mentorship: Teaching Beyond the Classroom
Nov
17
12:00 pm12:00

Mentorship: Teaching Beyond the Classroom

  • Herring Hall 129

Mentorship is among the most important ways that the Rice faculty engage with students. Join us on November 17th for a discussion with Steve Cox, Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics, and Illya Hicks, Associate Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics on the pedagogical value of developing and fostering mentoring relationships with graduate and undergraduate students.

This conversation is part of our Teaching Matters series for Rice faculty.

Please RSVP here. Lunch will be provided.