GRADUATE FELLOW APPOINTMENT PROCESS

The CTE recently designed a new program for Graduate Fellows. Fellows are chosen from those students who have completed the entire Graduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning, and they are selected via a competitive application process. Each Fellow receives a stipend for his or her work.


GEORGE R. BROWN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

Rebecca Smith

CTE Graduate Fellow
PhD, Computer Science

Rebecca Smith is a PhD student in the Computer Science department. Her primary research interests lie in computer systems, and she is currently exploring memory management techniques for virtualized systems. She also enjoys designing tools and techniques for improving computer science education, with a recent focus on teaching software testing. She has previously served as a co-instructor for COMP 140, an introductory course on computational thinking.


WIESS SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCES

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Patricia Bilbao Ergueta

CTE Graduate Fellow
PhD, Physics

Patricia Bilbao Ergueta is a doctoral candidate in the Physics and Astronomy department. She studies quantum magnetism with a focus on systems of strongly correlated electrons. Her previous research includes the search for SUSY as a summer student at CERN. Patricia obtained her B.S. in at the University of the Basque Country in Spain and her Master’s degree at Rice University.

Emily Schultz

CTE Graduate Fellow
PhD, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Emily Schultz is a PhD candidate in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology program at Rice. Her current research focuses on the effects of environmental variation on plant population dynamics. As an undergraduate at Scripps College, she worked as a TA for the Introductory Biology and Biostatistics courses. Emily has continued teaching at Rice, both as a TA and as the instructor for Outreach Development and the EEB Freshman Seminar.

Thomas Clements

CTE Graduate Fellow
PhD, Biochemistry and Cell Biology

After graduating from Purdue University in 2012 with a degree in Biochemistry through the Chemistry Department and minors in Biology and Forensic Science, Thomas Clements came to Rice University as a graduate student in the Biochemistry and Cell Biology (BCB) PhD. program in the BioSciences Department. His research focuses on characterizing novel genetic interactions in the development of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) and brain angiogenesis using the zebrafish, Danio rerio. He is also interested in improving CRISPR-Cas gene editing tools in zebrafish. Outside of the lab, Thomas is currently the Co-Instructor with Dr. Beth Beason for BIOC 111, which is the introductory Biology Lab Course for BIOC majors at Rice University. He is an active member in the Genetics Society of America, the former President of the BCB Graduate Student Association (GSA), and an alum of the Gulf-Coast Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching.